There was already Safety posters in 1920

I found this Blood Poison Health and Safety poster over at the Wisconsin Historical Images site.

Blood pioson Health and Safety poster

The sign or poster warns International Harvester factory employees about the signs, causes, and prevention of blood poison.

The sign reads, “Blood Poison; Signs: Heat, swelling, pain. Cause: Germs in a wound. These germs are everywhere, on the skin, on floors, walls and tools, in dust, water, rust, etc.

  1. Do not pour water into a wound. Do not use fat meat, onion stocks, or spider webs on a wound.
  2. Allow the wound to bleed some to wash out the germs.
  3. Apply iodine to kill any left in wound.
  4. Cover wound with clean cloth and bandage to keep other germs.

Consult a surgeon:

  1. Always if the wound is through the skin.
  2. To assure yourself no parts beneath the skin have been injured that may cause permanent deformities.
  3. To know that all necessary treatment has been given.

For deep or severe wounds do nothing but wrap in clean cloth and consult your surgeon at once. Do not use iodine about the eyes. One drop in the eyes may produce blindness.

If hurt at work in the shop see your Works doctor.”

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